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breathtakingdestinations:

New York City - New York - USA (von EJP Photo)
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theniftyfifties:

Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller get hot dogs,  May 1957. Photo by Sam Shaw 
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breathtakingdestinations:

Sidi Bou Said - Tunisia (von khowaga1)
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asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
asylum-art:

Wayne Quilliam: Photography in context of Indigenous Australian culture
Series of Aboriginal artist Wayne Quilliam “Lowanna” (beautiful woman) transforms the concept of the body and the earth studying the psychological implications of the human habitat. Wayne’s work is rooted in sensitivity. He speaks of the connection and isolation, loss and discovery and tragic irony poorly designed
Wayne Quilliam is considered one of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal photographic artists working on the global stage with more than 130 solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Europe, Asia and the USA. He has been awarded what is considered one of the most prestigious Australian art accolades, the 2009 NAIDOC (National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee) Artist of the Year. In 2008 he won the Human Rights Award for his work on the Apology with the Koori Mail and was a finalist in the prestigious Walkley Awards for a social documentary on the block in Redfern, Sydney. Starting from 10th January 2010 the art place berlin in the Park Inn Berlin-Alexanderplatz will present the large-sized photographies of the Lowanna series. The works will be shown in the context of paintings by protagonists of Australia’s indigenous art, among others Kudditji Kngwarreye and Jeannie Long Petyarre.
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weirdvintage:

Sunny Side Up, c. 1920s (via)
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resonares:

basementfox: Copyright © 2013, Basement Fox, All…
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asylum-art:

Surreal images by Yutha YamanakaPhotography
Yutha Yamanaka currently challenges himself with a 365 day project, creating one staggering image a day, uploading it to his Flickr. His photography is characterized by a surreal twist, often finding expressions in otherworldly self portraits. Yutha Yamanaka was born and raised in Tokyo, Japan, today he lives in Denpasar, Bali.
asylum-art:

Surreal images by Yutha YamanakaPhotography
Yutha Yamanaka currently challenges himself with a 365 day project, creating one staggering image a day, uploading it to his Flickr. His photography is characterized by a surreal twist, often finding expressions in otherworldly self portraits. Yutha Yamanaka was born and raised in Tokyo, Japan, today he lives in Denpasar, Bali.
asylum-art:

Surreal images by Yutha YamanakaPhotography
Yutha Yamanaka currently challenges himself with a 365 day project, creating one staggering image a day, uploading it to his Flickr. His photography is characterized by a surreal twist, often finding expressions in otherworldly self portraits. Yutha Yamanaka was born and raised in Tokyo, Japan, today he lives in Denpasar, Bali.
asylum-art:

Surreal images by Yutha YamanakaPhotography
Yutha Yamanaka currently challenges himself with a 365 day project, creating one staggering image a day, uploading it to his Flickr. His photography is characterized by a surreal twist, often finding expressions in otherworldly self portraits. Yutha Yamanaka was born and raised in Tokyo, Japan, today he lives in Denpasar, Bali.
asylum-art:

Surreal images by Yutha YamanakaPhotography
Yutha Yamanaka currently challenges himself with a 365 day project, creating one staggering image a day, uploading it to his Flickr. His photography is characterized by a surreal twist, often finding expressions in otherworldly self portraits. Yutha Yamanaka was born and raised in Tokyo, Japan, today he lives in Denpasar, Bali.
asylum-art:

Surreal images by Yutha YamanakaPhotography
Yutha Yamanaka currently challenges himself with a 365 day project, creating one staggering image a day, uploading it to his Flickr. His photography is characterized by a surreal twist, often finding expressions in otherworldly self portraits. Yutha Yamanaka was born and raised in Tokyo, Japan, today he lives in Denpasar, Bali.
asylum-art:

Surreal images by Yutha YamanakaPhotography
Yutha Yamanaka currently challenges himself with a 365 day project, creating one staggering image a day, uploading it to his Flickr. His photography is characterized by a surreal twist, often finding expressions in otherworldly self portraits. Yutha Yamanaka was born and raised in Tokyo, Japan, today he lives in Denpasar, Bali.
asylum-art:

Surreal images by Yutha YamanakaPhotography
Yutha Yamanaka currently challenges himself with a 365 day project, creating one staggering image a day, uploading it to his Flickr. His photography is characterized by a surreal twist, often finding expressions in otherworldly self portraits. Yutha Yamanaka was born and raised in Tokyo, Japan, today he lives in Denpasar, Bali.
asylum-art:

Surreal images by Yutha YamanakaPhotography
Yutha Yamanaka currently challenges himself with a 365 day project, creating one staggering image a day, uploading it to his Flickr. His photography is characterized by a surreal twist, often finding expressions in otherworldly self portraits. Yutha Yamanaka was born and raised in Tokyo, Japan, today he lives in Denpasar, Bali.
asylum-art:

Surreal images by Yutha YamanakaPhotography
Yutha Yamanaka currently challenges himself with a 365 day project, creating one staggering image a day, uploading it to his Flickr. His photography is characterized by a surreal twist, often finding expressions in otherworldly self portraits. Yutha Yamanaka was born and raised in Tokyo, Japan, today he lives in Denpasar, Bali.
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theniftyfifties:

Grit Hübscher in Saga mink stole by Berger, 1957. Photo by F. C. Gundlach.
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